Electra one


SolarWorld presents electric aircraft „Elektra One“ in U.S. debut at huge aviation show in Oshkosh

 
The zero-emissions Elektra One aircraft, presented by SolarWorld, will make its U.S. debut at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2011.
SolarWorld (Bonn, Germany, and Hillsboro, Ore.) the largest U.S. manufacturer of solar photovoltaic (PV) panels for more than 35 years, will showcase the maiden U.S. appearance of a zero-emissions electric aircraft at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2011 in Oshkosh, Wis., starting Monday, July 25th, 2011. SolarWorld and Germany’s PC Aero are working together to pioneer the world’s first comparatively affordable electric aircraft system complete with solar-equipped aircraft and solar-charging hangar.Elektra One is designed for a range of more than 250 miles, a cruising speed of more than 100 mph and zero emissionsPC Aero’s Calin Gologan will make several speaking appearances at AirVenture, which is expected to attract more than 500,000 people. Gologan will outline his vision of electric flight, including a talk as part of the SolarWorld-sponsored World Electric Aircraft Symposium on Friday, July 29th. Elektra One will be on display in AirVenture’s Innovation Hangar, except at midday Wednesday, July 27, when it is expected to fly.

The single-seat Elektra One is designed for more than three hours of flight, a range of more than 250 miles, a cruising speed of more than 100 mph and zero emissions. With 1,400 propeller rotations a minute at cruising altitudes, Elektra One is nearly silent. The plane weighs 440 pounds, including battery, and can carry a payload of 220 pounds, including pilot.

SolarWorld and PC Aero are developing a new aviation filling station and hangar fitted with the company’s high-performance solar panels to service small aircraft, including the Elektra One, which also will bear SolarWorld photovoltaic cells to extend its range up to 30 percent.

“Elektra One is emblematic of a future in mobility that relies on efficient and environmentally sound electric vehicles,” said Frank Asbeck, CEO of SolarWorld. “We need to stop depending on fossil fuels – and their dirty, noisy use of scarce resources – to get from one place to another. Solar power, abundant and pervasive, is the obvious choice for travel in the skies.”

The Elektra One made its maiden flight in March in Augsburg, Germany, where Gologan’s vision of marrying the aircraft with a solar-charging hangar was conceptually demonstrated. PC Aero will begin taking orders for the aircraft in Europe and the U.S. in 2012. Gologan intends for a complete system – solar-equipped airplane combined with a hangar – to be priced around $145,000, or 100,000 euro.

Ready to take to the skies in a reasonably affordable electric plane far away from the trail of jet fuel? Then the time is perfect to plan your travel on the Electra One from German-based PC – Aero.This single-seat electric ultralight is made from lightweight composites is powered with a 13.5 kW electric engine and can fly for three hours at cruise speed of 160 kilometers per hour.

Plus the engine is electric and remarkably quiet. The plane just won the Lindbergh Prize for Electric Aircraft Vision award.

The Elektra One’s hangar roof features 20 square meters of photovoltaic cells from Solarworld. The cells provide power with zero emissions, save for what fuel was used to generate the initial electricity.

The plane is expected to hit the market for less than $145,000 ($100,000 EUR) in early 2012 once certification is completed.

Lindbergh Electric Aircraft Prize (LEAP) founder Erik Lindbergh announced the award at last week’s World Electric Aircraft Symposium. LEAP’s programs are designed to recognize innovation that will drive aviation’s culture, economy, and future.

The Elektra One has been designed to demand little in the way of energy. Not only does the plane stay aloft for three hours, it flies at a price considerably lower than a road car, say the plane designers

The design of the Elektra One comes from PC-Aero’s founder, Calin Gologan. Test pilot Jon Karkow flew the Elektra One on its maiden flight on March 19 this year in Augsburg, Germany.

Apart from reducing the costs of flying an ultralight, one of the Elektra One’s greatest advantages is its very low noise level. The propeller speed is optimized for low noise too. Cruising at 160 km/h, the propeller is rotating at just 1400 RPM. At this speed, PC-Aero claims it makes one fifth of the noise of a classic light aircraft and half the noise of an ultralight.

Gologan says his ultimate vision is to create a bridge that leads from the world of leisure aviation to electric transportation and a minimal footprint.

Hallelujah!

PHOTOS: PC-Aero

Source: Clean Technica (http://s.tt/12Yda)

Ready to take to the skies in a reasonably affordable electric plane far away from the trail of jet fuel? Then the time is perfect to plan your travel on the Electra One from German-based PC – Aero.

This single-seat electric ultralight is made from lightweight composites is powered with a 13.5 kW electric engine and can fly for three hours at cruise speed of 160 kilometers per hour.

Plus the engine is electric and remarkably quiet. The plane just won the Lindbergh Prize for Electric Aircraft Vision award.

The Elektra One’s hangar roof features 20 square meters of photovoltaic cells from Solarworld. The cells provide power with zero emissions, save for what fuel was used to generate the initial electricity.

The plane is expected to hit the market for less than $145,000 ($100,000 EUR) in early 2012 once certification is completed.

Lindbergh Electric Aircraft Prize (LEAP) founder Erik Lindbergh announced the award at last week’s World Electric Aircraft Symposium. LEAP’s programs are designed to recognize innovation that will drive aviation’s culture, economy, and future.

The Elektra One has been designed to demand little in the way of energy. Not only does the plane stay aloft for three hours, it flies at a price considerably lower than a road car, say the plane designers

The design of the Elektra One comes from PC-Aero’s founder, Calin Gologan. Test pilot Jon Karkow flew the Elektra One on its maiden flight on March 19 this year in Augsburg, Germany.

Apart from reducing the costs of flying an ultralight, one of the Elektra One’s greatest advantages is its very low noise level. The propeller speed is optimized for low noise too. Cruising at 160 km/h, the propeller is rotating at just 1400 RPM. At this speed, PC-Aero claims it makes one fifth of the noise of a classic light aircraft and half the noise of an ultralight.

Gologan says his ultimate vision is to create a bridge that leads from the world of leisure aviation to electric transportation and a minimal footprint.

Hallelujah!

Source: Clean Technica (http://s.tt/12Yda)

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Über hinterauer

Pensionated Radiologist, interested in Green Chemistry, Technology, Environment and Share | var addthis_config = {"data_track_clickback":true}; nce.
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3 Antworten zu Electra one

  1. hinterauer schreibt:

    A promise for a bright future.

  2. hinterauer schreibt:

    Das Elekrozeitalter geht auch mit in die Luft. Hoche Energieausbeute und die Möglichkeit zur Kombination mit Brennstoffzeellen zur Vergrößerung der Reichweite scheinen Zukunft zu haben.

  3. hinterauer schreibt:

    reddit this

    Comments (74)

    Thomson Airways ran a biofuel-powered flight to the Canary Islands in October 2011. Photograph: Dave Thompson/PA

    Are biofuel flights really a good thing for the environment? How can we ever produce enough biofuels to power all flights? And won’t they just consume precious land that could be used to grow food instead?

    T Granger, by email

    Last week saw the first commercial flight part-powered by biofuels take off from a UK airport. The TUI Travel Boeing 757 flight from Birmingham to Lanzarote took off and landed without any reported hitches. No technical modifications were made to the plane with one of its two engines powered with a 50/50 blend of conventional Jet A1 fuel and a „Hydroprocessed Esters and Fatty Acids“ fuel produced from used cooking oil. TUI Travel said the fuel was supplied by a Dutch firm called SkyNRG and that the fuel was „approved as sustainable by WWF and the Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels“.

    Judging by the increasing number of airlines around the world announcing such flights, and the likely imminent inclusion by the EU of aviation within its emissions trading scheme, it would appear that biofuels are likely to play a very significant role in the future of aviation. Aviation – unlike its ground-based transport alternatives – is currently totally reliant on fuels with the energy density offered by a fossil fuel such as kerosene. So a plug-and-play biofuel substitute for kerosene seems to be the only viable alternative at present. After all, we can’t electrify our planes or power them by nuclear fission (or not in a way that would be accepted by paying passengers) – and most aircraft operating or purchased today have a predicted lifespan of at least 40 years.

    But just how „sustainable“ are the biofuels used in aircraft? And will they only act to force up food prices? To rely solely on second-hand cooking oil seems complete folly. But the aviation industry says it is only using this source of biofuel for demonstration purposes. TUI Travel, for example, says it is looking at using biofuels made from the „purge family of plants as well as from camelina“. Meanwhile, Virgin has just announced a „breakthrough“ in biofuel production with a fuel produced from „reprocessed waste gases from industrial steel production“. And other aviation fuel developers say they are exploring algae-based biofuels.

    Or, perhaps, all this talk of biofuels is a convenient distraction: with aviation said to be the fastest-growing source of greenhouse gas emissions, should we instead be concentrating on reducing the number of aircraft we send into the sky? Or is aviation so crucial to us all that it deserves a special status of exemption, as it has long enjoyed when it comes to fuel duty and VAT?

    This column is an experiment in crowd-sourcing a reader’s question, so please let us know your own thoughts below (as opposed to emailing them) and, if quoting figures to support your points, please provide a link to the source. I will also be inviting various interested parties to join the debate, too.

    • Please send your own environment question to ask.leo.and.lucy@guardian.co.uk.
    Or, alternatively, message me on Twitter @LeoHickman
    Another solution, if renwable, especially out of wast, and to be „totally recycled“.

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